Do Pro Surfers Use Traction Pads?

July 16, 2022 3 min read

If you're wondering if you need a traction pad, this article can help. We'll discuss which type of traction pad is best for you, as well as which ones are the most expensive. We'll also look at some pros' favorite traction pads, so you can decide if they're right for you. Read on to learn more! Here are some of our favorites.

Whether Or Not You Need a Traction Pad

Surfing traction pads are made to give you an extra grip on the board. These pads usually have beads or bumps on them. These traction pads offer more grip than wax alone and are a good choice for people who want to reduce the risk of injuries while surfing. They can help you stand up more quickly and place your feet more securely on the board. Traction pads also require less maintenance than wax.

To apply a traction pad, you should first prepare your surfboard for it. Before you apply it, you should wash the board thoroughly with water. Cleanboards with wax should be clean before applying a pad. A knife can be used to remove excess wax. After cleaning, you should apply the traction pad. Let the magic gun dry for two to four hours. Once you have cured the pad, you can hit the waves!

Traction pads are not necessary for everyone. The right one for you depends on the style of surfing and the length of your surfboard. Longer boards need traction pads, while shorter funboards do not require them. However, they may be useful if you're surfing with your back foot stuck in the water. A traction pad will help you turn harder on your surfboard without slipping off.

Which Traction Pad is Best

Pro surfers use various traction pads. One of them is the Dakine Launch Surf Traction Pad. Made of biodegradable EVA foam, this pad features maximum cutouts to enhance grip. Its lightweight design is designed to reduce drag and weight. Dakine is known for its quality surfboards. Its traction pads are tied to other leading pro surfers. You can check out the Dakine Launch Surf Traction Pad in our shop.

Another popular model is the Octopus Hobgood 2-Piece Traction Pad. It has a slim profile and diamond-grooved EVA foam. If you're on a tight budget, you can go with this one. It's designed to be sticky and grippy. This traction pad is great for those who want to do tricks and do airs.

The FCS traction pad is built for a strong grip. It may be a bit uncomfortable to your ankles and shins, but it won't let your foot slip off. A Julian Wilson model with channels and holes adds extra grip. The foam is thin and maintains the board's feel. It is comfortable and helps improve your board's control. These models offer a range of sizes, depending on your preference.

Which Traction Pad is the Most Expensive

Depending on the level of competition and personal preference, pro surfers may prefer one of several traction pads. One-piece traction pads are the most convenient to install, as there are fewer pieces on the board. However, these traction pads may be a bit more difficult to install and can peel off. This is why one-piece traction pads are not recommended for the average surfer.

The cost of pro surfing traction pads may be a factor in the decision. They vary widely in terms of construction and performance, with different traction pads offering different levels of comfort and performance. Those targeted at beginners generally have less traction than more serious riders. This is because the majority of longboards are more than nine feet long, and traction pads will cover only a tiny portion of the board.

Surfboard traction pads are a necessary part of high-performance surfing. Unlike regular surfboards, they provide back foot grip and help surfers generate power through pumping. Different traction pads are designed for specific styles of surfing. However, they cannot be switched out easily, and removal and replacement are time-consuming. Therefore, if you want a pad that will last a long time, consider an eco-friendly model.



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